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CSS-Tricks

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Tips, Tricks, and Techniques on using Cascading Style Sheets. CSS-Tricks* is created, written by, and maintained by Chris Coyier and a team of swell people.

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Emcee Tips for a Conference or Meetup

There are some great resources out there to help conference speakers give better talks, but fewer for people who are preparing to take on the role of emcee at meetup or conference. I've been fortunate enough to emcee conferences more than 20 times now, most recently JAMstack_conf which I help organize. I also enjoy hosting smaller, less formal meetups which benefit just as much from having somebody to keep things rolling nicely along. Since emcee-ing is a rather visible … Read article The post Emcee Tips for a Conference or Meetup appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


Create Amazingly Stable Tests Your Way — Coded and Code-Less

Testim’s end-to-end test automation delivers the speed and stability of AI-based codeless tests, with the power of code. You get the flexibility to record or code tests, run on third-party grids, fit your workflow and tools including CI, Git and more. Join the Dev Kit beta to start writing stable tests in code. About Testim At Testim, we too are developers and testers, striving to release quality software faster. We built Testim because writing stable end-to-end tests was … Read article The post Create Amazingly Stable Tests Your Way — Coded and Code-Less appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


Embracing the Universal Web

There are constantly new features appearing in browsers—from subgrid to variable fonts to better developer tools. It's a really great time to be re-thinking everything we know about design on the web. Responsive design has served us well over the years, but it's still rooted in the limitations of the web from 2010. Ten years later, we're able to create more "Intrinsic" designs (a term coined by Jen Simmons) and hopefully, re-think some "best practices" that are now holding us … Read article The post Embracing the Universal Web appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


It’s my job, and yours.

The role of ethics in our modern web space has been on my mind for the past few years and I suspect it will occupy my thoughts increasingly as I move forward. With each encounter of a questionable feature or setting on a website, I can't help but think of all of the people involved and the discussions that may (or may not) have taken place. Marketing has always straddled the line between promoting a product to an open and … Read article The post It’s my job, and yours. appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


The future is bright, because the future is static

I've been doing this web thing for money for 10 years this year and although I haven’t been around as long as some folks, I feel like I've seen a few cycles come and go now, so let's say that hot new things are often cynically viewed, initially. This milestone of mine has also got me in a retrospective mood, too, and the question “What about building websites has you interested this year?“ has only encouraged that. When I first … Read article The post The future is bright, because the future is static appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


The Typed Object Model

I help write technical documentation and one feature I've been writing about this year that has really stood out is the Typed Object Model (or Typed OM). If you haven't come across it yet you would be forgiven as it's pretty new. It falls under the CSS Houdini suite of API's and on the surface seems the least exciting. However, it underpins all of them and will eventually change how we view CSS as a language. It allows for typing… Read article The post The Typed Object Model appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


Techniques for a Newspaper Layout with CSS Grid and Border Lines Between Elements

I recently had to craft a newspaper-like design that featured multiple row and column spans with divider lines in between them. Take a look at the mockup graphic here and see if it makes you sweat at all. If you’re like me, you have been around a while and know just how difficult this would have been with old layout techniques. Newspaper design with line dividers between cells The project came with a few requirements: Show the outlines of the … Read article The post Techniques for a Newspaper Layout with CSS Grid and Border Lines Between Elements appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


Variations on Theme: Reinventing Type on the Web

If anyone knows anything about me, it’s usually one of two things: that I have two outrageously fluffy dogs, or that I like fonts and typography. Like, really really like them. So while I am super excited about how well Tristan is doing with his hydrotherapy —we’re walking 50% further than he was able just a couple months ago, without having to take breaks in the middle—I'm even more riled up about variable fonts. I know, you’re probably all really… Read article The post Variations on Theme: Reinventing Type on the Web appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


Build your own React

Wowza! Rodrigo Pombo’s article about how to build React from scratch is fantastic, not only because it’s well written, but because of the outstanding interaction design: each line in the code examples ge highlighted and explored in further detail as you scroll down the page. This makes it super easy to walk through each process step by step: How neat is that? This definitely feels like a new way we should consider showing technical information I reckon as it’s just … Read article The post Build your own React appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


No, Absolutely Not

I think the difference between a junior and senior front-end developer isn't in their understanding or familiarity with a particular tech stack, toolchain, or whether they can write flawless code. Instead, it all comes down to this: how they push back against bad ideas. What I've learned this year is that web performance will suffer if you don't say no to the marketing department because you'll suddenly find yourself with eighteen different analytics scripts on your website. If you don't … Read article The post No, Absolutely Not appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


JAMstack, Fugu, and Houdini

What has me really excited about building websites recently is the fact that we, as front-end developers, have the power to do so much more. Only a few years ago, I would need a whole team of developers to accomplish what can now be done with just a few amazing tools. Although the projects/tools/technologies are almost endless, in this article I'd like to talk about the top three that have me the most excited about building websites today, and for … Read article The post JAMstack, Fugu, and Houdini appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


Oh, the Places JavaScript Will Go

I tend to be pretty vocal about the problems client-side JavaScript cause from a performance perspective. We're shipping more JavaScript than ever to our user's devices and the result is increasingly brittle and resource-intensive experiences. It's... not great. But that doesn't mean I don't like JavaScript. On the contrary, I enjoy working in JavaScript quite a bit. I just wish we were a little more selective about where we use it. What excites me is when JavaScript starts reaching into … Read article The post Oh, the Places JavaScript Will Go appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


How Do You Remove Unused CSS From a Site?

Here's what I'd like you to know upfront: this is a hard problem. If you've landed here because you're hoping to be pointed at a tool you can run that tells you exactly what CSS you can delete from your project, well... there are tools out there, but I'm warning you to be very careful with them because none of them can ever tell you the complete story. I know what you want. You want to run the tool, … Read article The post How Do You Remove Unused CSS From a Site? appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


Six Months Using Firebase Web Performance Monitoring

I don't really think of Firebase as a performance monitoring tool (all I ever think about is auth and real-time data storage), but nevertheless, it totally has that feature. Justin Ribeiro... [A] tool to track what real users in the wild are experiencing with an easy setup? Yes, please. [...] I’ve been using Firebase web perf tracking since June on this very blog. Let’s take a look at the good, the bad, and the downright confusing portions of … Read article The post Six Months Using Firebase Web Performance Monitoring appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


serpstack

(This is a sponsored post.) Is it your job to keep an eye on your company's search engine placement? Or your clients? Or are you building a tool to do just that? Manually Googling stuff isn't going to scale particularly well there. Wouldn't it be nice if you could hit an API and it would return you nicely formatted data with this information? That's what serpstack is. A "serp" being a "Search Engine Results Page." You hit it with … Read article The post serpstack appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


The Tools are Here

Heading into 2020, it occurs to me that I've now been making websites for 20 years. Looking back on that time, it seems as though our practices have been in near-constant churn, and that our progress did not always seem linear. But ultimately, even the missteps and tangents along the way have contributed to a pattern of refinement, and now for the first time, it feels like we'll have a standard pattern for most of the technical challenges we face. … Read article The post The Tools are Here appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


Teaching CSS

I've been using CSS as a web developer since CSS became something we could actually use. My first websites were built using <font> tags and <table>s for layout. I remember arguments about whether this whole CSS thing was a good idea at all. I was quickly convinced, mostly due to the ability to easily change the font on an entire site in one place. Managing common styles was so useful at a time when most websites were just a … Read article The post Teaching CSS appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


The Communal Cycle of Sharing

What I'm interested in this year is how we're continuing to expand on tools, services, and shared side projects to collectively guide where we take the web next, and the way we're sharing that. So many other mediums—mostly analog ones—have been around for ages and have a deeper history. In the grand scheme of things, the web, and thus the job of building for it, are still pretty new. We talk about open source and licenses, the ebbs and flows … Read article The post The Communal Cycle of Sharing appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


The Best Cocktail in Town

I admit I've held in a lot of pent-up frustration about the direction web development has taken the past few years. There is the complexity. It requires a steep learning curve. It focuses more on more configuration than it does development. That's not exactly great news for folks like me who consider themselves to be more on the design side of the front-end spectrum. I remember grimacing the first time I found myself using a Grunt workflow … Read article The post The Best Cocktail in Town appeared first on CSS-Tricks.


The Kind of Development I Like

I'm turning 40 next year (yikes!) and even though I've been making websites for over 25 years, I feel like I'm finally beginning to understand the kind of development I like. Expectedly, these are not new revelations and my views can be summed up by two older Computer Science adages that pre-date my career. Composition over inheritance Convention over configuration Allow me to take you on a short journey. In modern component-driven web development, I often end up with or … Read article The post The Kind of Development I Like appeared first on CSS-Tricks.